Over the summer, I decided to let go of the ‘Should’ books. These are the ones that caught my fancy. Enjoy!

The best of the summer so far is Free Fall: A Late in Life Love Affair by Rae Francoeur. Such a gorgeous story of a woman starved for pleasure meeting up with a skilled, seasoned lover whose intentions are to ‘separate her from her propriety’. (Swear, I’ve used that phrase as often as I can since I read it in her book). Once the affair begins, the two lovers plan weekend romps to enjoy nudity and wine. Along the way, she navigates her Ex and his mental illness, her nasty boss, and she still manages to fight fairly with her lover despite distance. Francoeur’s writing is racy and gorgeous, just like the man awakening her body. I adore the dance between his aggressive, physical masculinity and her feminine surrender. Perfect read for summer, for gentlemen or ladies!

High Fidelity was next for comic relief, and I think I may understand men a little bit better now. Ultimately, I think this book is about insecurity and trusting love. I was surprised to read that men have idealistic hopes about marriage too, like finding exotic panties all over the living space, or long, smoldering glances over dinner from the adoring wife. I think Nick Hornby captures the reality of that gray area between college and adulthood perfectly. Overall: fun, interesting read.

Last one. I read a book that had me crushin’ on a crush on a gay man. How I Learned To Snap by Kirk Read is one of those I laughed, I cried, I felt inspired sort of stories. I’ve never really witnessed violence toward someone else just for being different, so reading his account gave me an entirely new perspective on how difficult it is to be harrassed about being gay, especially so young. And Kirk had some friends he could be comfortably himself with – imagine the kids who don’t, and have no idea how to deal with something that confuses the hell out of them, and incites torture from people they’d otherwise try to impress. I mean, the teenage years are difficult enough. But despite ridicule and violence, Kirk never stopped believing in himself, his writing or just his right to be loved, heard and respected, too. And he never lost his sense of humor – at least in the book. I was completely inspired by his spirit.

His mom is such the unsung heroine of this story for letting Kirk make his own decisions and having her way with his dad, so that Kirk could make his mark in theater. I absolutely loved this book, and in a perfect world, it would make a great addition to English Lit assignments. We all need to learn some empathy for our peers in high school, and maybe this would ease the knots of tension for a lot of gay and lesbian students.

Happy Reading!

xoxo

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